101 for the One-on-One

Alexandra ArrivillagaIn most companies, regardless of the field, one on one meetings with direct reports are pretty regimented. These check-ins can last anywhere from 15 minutes to an hour, but may at times feel unnecessary. If you’re dealing with an employee who is doing well and doesn’t have any issues, this may feel like you’re wasting there time. However, these meetings have the potential to be extremely useful not only for the two of you, but possibly for the company as well. Following these tips will encourage a more productive use of time and hopefully a breath of fresh air!

Change Your Environment : Even if these meetings only last 15 minutes, go for a walk outside. Having these meetings away from the office will help the two of you really focus on the meeting instead of being distracted by the eight million other things vying for your attention. If you’re sitting in the conference room, it’s very easy to just talk about current projects at the office. By getting out of the office you’ll shake up the routine, and the employee will also be able to talk more freely without the fear of being overheard by other co-workers.

It’s all in the questions. Instead of just asking how it’s going, get a bit more creative. Come up with some open ended questions that look at the bigger picture. Come up with specific questions. What are this employee’s  goals? How can you help this employee be more productive? Really check in, and get to know who this person is and how you can help them grow. If you feel like the employee isn’t really engaging with your questions, tell them what you’ve been working on and something that has been challenging for you. Soliciting advice or even just revealing some insight into your job and role might be helpful for the other employee.

Share the Mic : If there is something in particular that you need to address with this employee – by all means talk about it. However, this should really be a chance for the employee to have the floor. As a manager, you talk at your team a lot. Look at this as a chance for the individual team member to speak up about any of his or her concerns or thoughts.

One-on-ones are important because they offer an opportunity that is easily overlooked during the day, when everyone is wrapped up in their own work. Look at one-on-ones as a chance to get to know your employees and for them to know you. One-on-ones are a chance for you to offer professional development and create a space for the employee  to air any grievances, share ideas and reflect on their work.