101 for the One-on-One

Alexandra ArrivillagaIn most companies, regardless of the field, one on one meetings with direct reports are pretty regimented. These check-ins can last anywhere from 15 minutes to an hour, but may at times feel unnecessary. If you’re dealing with an employee who is doing well and doesn’t have any issues, this may feel like you’re wasting there time. However, these meetings have the potential to be extremely useful not only for the two of you, but possibly for the company as well. Following these tips will encourage a more productive use of time and hopefully a breath of fresh air!

Change Your Environment : Even if these meetings only last 15 minutes, go for a walk outside. Having these meetings away from the office will help the two of you really focus on the meeting instead of being distracted by the eight million other things vying for your attention. If you’re sitting in the conference room, it’s very easy to just talk about current projects at the office. By getting out of the office you’ll shake up the routine, and the employee will also be able to talk more freely without the fear of being overheard by other co-workers.

It’s all in the questions. Instead of just asking how it’s going, get a bit more creative. Come up with some open ended questions that look at the bigger picture. Come up with specific questions. What are this employee’s  goals? How can you help this employee be more productive? Really check in, and get to know who this person is and how you can help them grow. If you feel like the employee isn’t really engaging with your questions, tell them what you’ve been working on and something that has been challenging for you. Soliciting advice or even just revealing some insight into your job and role might be helpful for the other employee.

Share the Mic : If there is something in particular that you need to address with this employee – by all means talk about it. However, this should really be a chance for the employee to have the floor. As a manager, you talk at your team a lot. Look at this as a chance for the individual team member to speak up about any of his or her concerns or thoughts.

One-on-ones are important because they offer an opportunity that is easily overlooked during the day, when everyone is wrapped up in their own work. Look at one-on-ones as a chance to get to know your employees and for them to know you. One-on-ones are a chance for you to offer professional development and create a space for the employee  to air any grievances, share ideas and reflect on their work.

 

How to Build Customer Relationships

Alexandra ArrivillagaTalk amongst yourselves: Make sure that your sales and marketing teams are in alignment. This means that they should be communicating regularly to make sure that they are presenting a united front to current and potential clients. Additionally, be keeping these two arms of your company in conversation, they can share data, information and insight with each other regarding the current and aspirational client base. By connecting these two teams both will understand who they are targeting and what traits make for an ideal customer. In addition to face to face meetings, there are a number of digital services and systems that can be incorporated into company infrastructure to facilitate these sorts of interior dialogues across departments.

Social media: Go to the customers. Create conversations relevant to your company and your customers. The easiest place to engage with your customers is on social media platforms. Come up with ways to engage with them there. Not only does this create a great forum for feedback, but your customers will feel actively engaged with your company, its services and products. Consider using tools that help identify trends when creating content on these platforms so that your content is au courant.
In addition to creating a dialogue with your customers through social media platforms, consider incorporating a live chat element onto your company website, and make sure that you have dedicated staff that will respond to customer inquiries promptly. Live chat can provide a quicker alternative to traditional phone-based customer service, immediate customer solutions, and potential leads for the sales department.

Take surveys: Although this shouldn’t be done so frequently that it becomes a deterrent or dis-incentivizes potential customers from engaging on your platform, surveys can be an excellent tool for showing that the opinions of your customers matter.

Positive reinforcement: Find ways to reward customers. Reward those that repeatedly show their loyalty and/or engage heavily with the company. Offer incentives, discount codes and more. Anything that encourages the customers to continue utilizing your services.

The Human Touch: Though this can be challenging at scale, try to find ways to connect with your customers in ways that remind them that there are people behind the company and its services who care about building relationships with the customers as well as addressing their needs. Get creative about how to do this at scale if you are  a larger company, and see how regional divisions can help with this as well.

When considering implementing any of these new measures intended to help connect with your customer base, there is one more thing that’s very important to keep in mind. And that is transparency. Today consumers expect transparency, and companies are lucky in that there are so many tools to implement this. And when considering the objectives of your company, take care to align them with the needs of the client. Why is your company and its services or products beneficial to them? And be clear about this. Transparency will take customer building to a whole new level.

 

Lock It Up Security LLC

security cameras

Alexandra Arrivillaga is the owner of Lock It Up Security LLC, a commercial-based telecommunications company in Boston, MA that works to serve as a world-class provider of electronic security and low-voltage solutions. Working on a sub-contractor basis, Lock It Up Security LLC installs security cameras in businesses, small and large.